Cochran injunction lifted

A week before Johnnie L. Cochran died in March, the U.S. Supreme Court heard oral arguments in a case involving a disgruntled former client of the famed lawyer. Ulysses Tory had been banned, via permanent unjunction, from picketing Cochran's offices or disparaging his work in public. Tory felt Cochran did not represent him well in a civil rights lawsuit against the city of Los Angeles in the early 1980s. On Tuesday, the Supreme Court removed the injunction on a 7-2 vote, saying that the legal ban is an overly broad restraint of free speech and with Cochran's death "has lost its underlying rationale." It's on the front page of today's Daily Journal, and also reported online at the First Amendment Center.


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