Arts

Jazz Bakery coming back to Culver City in style

kirk-douglas-theatre-east.jpgThe non-profit Jazz Bakery received approval today from the Culver City city council to develop a new Frank Gehry-designed theater next to the Kirk Douglas Theatre on Washington Boulevard. The Jazz Bakery has been trying to find a home since being displaced from the Helms Bakery complex in 2009. From a Culver City Times blog:

According to the agreement, the property was given to the Jazz Bakery at no cost, with the understanding that they will develop on the site according to plans the Jazz Bakery submitted on January 13th of this year. The proposal included not only the 250-seat theater, but also a smaller "black box" theater, a bakery/cafe, rehearsal studios, community meeting rooms, a lobby gallery space, and a roof top deck.

According the proposal, the Jazz Bakery plans to offer about 250 shows per year and to charge approximately $35 per ticket.

The project is estimated to cost $10.2 million and will be paid for in part by $2 million grant from the Annenberg Foundation. The Jazz Bakery plans to launch a capital campaign to raise the funds for the rest of the project.

An old house occupies the property just east of the Kirk Douglas, the website says.

The Jazz Bakery performance space was launched by jazz vocalist Ruth Price in 1992.

Video bonus: Price performing with the Stan Getz Quartet on ABC's "Shindig!" on Feb. 24, 1965.


Photo from the Culver City Times website


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