Arts

Kent Twitchell murals inside redone Patriotic Hall

twitchell-mural-free-ballot.jpg
Kent Twitchell mural "Free Ballot"

The county-owned Bob Hope Patriotic Hall on Figueroa Street a bit south of downtown has been getting a makeover. Part of the project includes artist Kent Twitchell re-imagining original artworks of veterans by Helen Lundeberg that vanished from the building’s lobby in the 1970s. The building will be rededicated this week. Preview by ZevWeb:

Twitchell’s work, called “We the People, Out of Many, One,” consists of three large tableaux, each measuring 20 feet by 12 feet. It was commissioned by the Los Angeles County Arts Commission as part of the county’s Civic Art Program.


The Patriotic Hall setting represents an unusual venue for Twitchell: the great indoors. He is best known for his massive and much-celebrated outdoor works, including “Harbor Freeway Overture,” that have helped define the L.A. cityscape for decades. But some of his greatest exterior works have been lost over the years, including the six-story high “Ed Ruscha Monument,” which was painted over by work crews in 2006. As he started work on the Patriotic Hall project, Twitchell said that he welcomed the opportunity to create art inside, since the outdoors increasingly seemed like “enemy territory.”

Although the rededication event on Friday, November 8, is not open to the public, the building is already up and running as the new home of the county’s Department of Military and Veterans Affairs. The county’s Department of Mental Health also offers services to veterans in the building, which was originally dedicated in 1926. Other veterans service organizations are also expected to move in by the end of the year. Bob Hope Patriotic Hall, located at 1816 South Figueroa Street in downtown Los Angeles, has long been a familiar landmark to motorists traveling through the intersection of the 110 and 10 freeways.

Among those expected to take part Friday in the rededication is 103-year-old veteran Bea Cohen, believed to be the oldest living female veteran in California. Cohen, who served in the U.S. Army during World War II, remains an active volunteer for veterans’ causes.
The celebration of the building’s reopening after its $46 million renovation will be emceed by NBC4 weatherman Fritz Coleman.


More by Kevin Roderick:
Gustavo Arellano, many others join LA Times staff
Power out Monday across Malibu
Put Jamal Khashoggi Square outside the Saudi consulate on Sawtelle
Here's who the LA Times has newly hired*
LA Observed Notes: Clippers hire big-time writer, unfunny Emmys, editor memo at the Times and more
Recent Arts stories on LA Observed:
Gandhi and Glass, Shakespeare and Prokofiev brought to life
Photos: Joni Mitchell tribute concert downtown
Down the digital rabbit hole in two CTG productions
Sounds of silence
'Don Carlo' speaks to today, as does Los Angeles Philharmonic at 100
Dos teatros and a resounding Echo
The Theatricum and other summer hotspots
Hollywood Bowl's summer scene and dance downtown


 

LA Observed on Twitter