Place

LA's first carmageddon: building the freeways

405-swath-wla.jpg
The field of destruction through West Los Angeles for the San Diego Freeway, looking south from the VA reservation in 1957. USC Libraries - Los Angeles Examiner Collection.

The freeway building boom that began with the Arroyo Seco Parkway in the late 1930s and continued for three decades made the city of four million people possible, but the damage done to neighborhoods and whole communities across Los Angeles was painful and, as we now know, permanent and profound. Nathan Masaters does a great job of pulling all the carnage together in a post for Gizmodo. "Los Angeles scarred its landscapes, split its communities, and displaced a quarter-million people to build its 527-mile freeway system," he writes. Whole thing.


More by Kevin Roderick:
LA Observed Notes: Let's call it a year
Tyrus Wong, legendary Disney artist, was 106
Read the LA Times response to Los Angeles Magazine's piece
Video: Guy hikes Griffith Park to Pt. Mugu in 69 hours
Norms Pico has definitely closed
Recent Place stories on LA Observed:
LA Observed Notes: Let's call it a year
Video: Guy hikes Griffith Park to Pt. Mugu in 69 hours
Winter solstice cave pictograph at Burro Flats
LA Observed Notes: A mea culpa, good reads and many media moves
Let there be light refraction
LA Observed Notes: Perez bombshell, LAT internment letters and more
Norms on Pico looks to be closing this month
LA Observed Notes: Good reads, Oakland tragedy, Oscar buzz and more



LA Observed on Twitter