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Bio
Jacob Soboroff is executive director of Why Tuesday?, a non-partisan group working to increase voter participation. In addition to vlogging about our voting system for Why Tuesday?, he contributes video blogs to NPR Sunday Soapbox, a political blog from Weekend Edition Sunday, and was a contributor to the PBS series Wired Science, a production of KCET Los Angeles and Wired magazine. Jacob started vlogging for LA Observed after running into Huell Howser at Los Angeles State Historic Park. In college he was a part-time advance man to New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg and presidential candidate Howard Dean. Jacob has an MA in political theory and philosophy from New York University. Email
Native Intelligence:
A light-weight traffic jam.
Usually these folks are doing the towing, not getting towed.
VIDEO: 2.2 million participated in Sydney. Did the lights go out in Los Angeles?
My talk with legendary journalist Carl Bernstein about Hillary Clinton, the L.A. Times and Paris Hilton -- just for starters.
The morning after the elusive Lake Machado alligator Reggie was captured and taken to his new home at the L.A. Zoo, I visited with the man who knew him best.
I visit with Griffith Park-area City Councilman Tom LaBonge, LAPD Chief Bill Bratton, and LAFD Captain Carlos Calvillo. Also, see what it's like below a fire department chopper dumping tons of water.
Five reporters on how to take the pulse of tens of thousands of activists
I fall into the river during my behind the scenes look at the master plan with Jenny Price & Co.
Do you know why we vote on Tuesday? Bradley does. He'll be talking about that, and more, at UCLA.
Apparently, Airbus almost stood us up.
VIDEO EXCLUSIVE: As Women's History Month approached the trailblazing journalist was told that when the press corps moves back to the White House in May, she'll lose her longtime front-row briefing room seat. Ironic? Helen thought so.
VIDEO: You don't have to go on a 9,840 foot conveyor belt ride through a 684,491 square foot 3-story plant before you can even hop in the car.
VIDEO: LAO was invited to (and subsequently trapped at) Barack Obama's first rally as a presidential candidate in Los Angeles. Before I escaped to upload this video, I caught up with a few of L.A.'s more familiar political faces and asked them for their Obama observations.
VIDEO: Paris and the Mayor. You saw the picture. What were they talking about? The Mayor tells us.
VIDEO: Who saved the 76 ball? And how? I'll show you.
LAO video: Stan Chambers talks with me about citizen journalism and the Kathy Fiscus story that created live televison news coverage in L.A.
LAO video: Produce may not be the only casualty of the cold -- Los Angeles area jobs are at risk.
LAO video: Rick Orlov gives me a sneak peek at tomorrow's column.
LAO video: Our team coverage of last night's Malibu fire continues.
Exclusive LAO video report: The workers in the Los Angeles Times pressroom have voted to be represented by a union for the first time in nearly four decades.
Just blocks from downtown, you'll find an entirely different kind of produce section. Don't look for a checkout counter.
Video report: USC gives Zach Fox a chance to get his job back.
Not much traffic to report... but a few jaywalking tickets. More strikes to come, EAA says.
LA Observed's new video blogger introduces himself in the aisles at Dutton's Brentwood.
Native Intelligence
Iris Schneider | Images by Iris Schneider of the march Saturday in downtown Los Angeles.
Iris Schneider | The Pussyhat Project was born at The Little Knittery, where women have been knitting pink hats for Saturday.
Gary Leonard | Take My Picture Gary Leonard runs weekly at LA Observed.
David Davis | Rapoport and David Davis discuss the first book that collects Lardner's daily journalism.
Molly Selvin | Sometimes the cable guy is really the cable guy. Sometimes the guy with dogs who lives in his RV is just homeless.
Bill Boyarsky
In this time of instant news, fake news and superficial tweets, it’s good to recall a couple of recent newspaper stories that are likely to last a while and make a difference. Last October, Los Angeles Times reporters David Zahniser and Emily Alpert Reyes stuck a knife deep into the Los Angeles city hall collective of politicians and big developer campaign contributors with their story about developer Samuel Leung’s contributions to local politicians and his subsequent winning approval of a 352 unit apartment that needed a city zoning change to be built. In December, Zahniser struck again with his story of major contributor Rick Caruso getting zoning changes for a 20-story building near the Beverly Center. Now with the city preparing for an election on March 7 their journalism could help determine the fate of the most controversial measure on the ballot, Measure S, limiting such developments. Reyes and Zahniser engaged in shoe-leather reporting in chasing down the more than 100 contributors connected to Leung—relatives, friends, employees and other associates. They gave a total of $600,000 to politicians who could help Leung’s development. The reporters were suspicious. "I am looking at these donors, and some of them looked odd to me. They’re folks who are working class and yet giving quite a big (amount) of money. As we kept knocking on doors, my colleague Emily Alpert Reyes and I, we found some of them who said they don’t remember giving, or they denied giving,” Zahniser told KPCC. In December, Zahniser wrote about how Caruso, developer of The Grove and other big projects, along with employees and family members, have donated more than $476,000 to city officials and their causes, including Mayor Eric Garcetti and city council members. They backed rezoning the property near the Beverly Center for a 20-story building. After neighborhood protests and Zahniser’s story, Caruso agreed to reduce the size of his building by almost 25 percent. His contributions, he said, don’t matter. “I’ve never believed for one minute that any contributions I’ve given has changed the opinion of any elected official,” Caruso told Zahniser. Measure S is directed against big projects and their contributor developers. It would impose a two-year moratorium on construction that increases density and ban the general plan zoning changes that have made the Leung and Caruso projects possible. The reporting by Zahniser and Reyes elevated the issue to the front page, up from the ranks of boring neighborhood-zoning beefs. Now it’s the subject of a major citywide debate. That’s what the media should do with city hall news. As the media flounders, these kinds of stories show a way for it to survive and even prosper. In this time of instant news, fake news and superficial tweets, it’s good to recall a couple of recent newspaper stories that are likely to last a while and make a difference.
Jenny Burman
Before I lived in Echo Park, there was a tiny 1920s bungalow-cottage-standalone house on N. Occidental in Silver Lake. I...
Here in Malibu
Deserted, except for some gulls. My favorite part is the light from a sign on the pier, reflected in...