Quakes

Seattle's Really Big One will be bigger than SoCal's Big One

subduction-zone-tny.jpgThe most popular story on the New Yorker website this week is a piece by Kathryn Schulz headlined "The Earthquake That will Devastate Seattle," or The Really Big One. In a way, I guess, it contains good news for Angelenos in the reminder that the expected-someday massive quake on the San Andreas Fault won't be nearly as destructive as, say, the 2011 quake in Japan that spanned the tsunami and between them killed 18,000 people. As a slip fault, the San Andreas just isn't capable of unleashing that much energy. The mythical Big One that media here have been throwing around for decades will be plenty unpleasant, just not epic.

As the New Yorker piece explains, it's the Pacific Northwest that has to worry about a Truly Big One.

Most people in the United States know just one fault line by name: the San Andreas, which runs nearly the length of California and is perpetually rumored to be on the verge of unleashing “the big one.” That rumor is misleading, no matter what the San Andreas ever does. Every fault line has an upper limit to its potency, determined by its length and width, and by how far it can slip. For the San Andreas, one of the most extensively studied and best understood fault lines in the world, that upper limit is roughly an 8.2—a powerful earthquake, but, because the Richter scale is logarithmic, only six per cent as strong as the 2011 event in Japan.


Just north of the San Andreas, however, lies another fault line. Known as the Cascadia subduction zone, it runs for seven hundred miles off the coast of the Pacific Northwest, beginning near Cape Mendocino, California, continuing along Oregon and Washington, and terminating around Vancouver Island, Canada. The “Cascadia” part of its name comes from the Cascade Range, a chain of volcanic mountains that follow the same course a hundred or so miles inland. The “subduction zone” part refers to a region of the planet where one tectonic plate is sliding underneath (subducting) another. Tectonic plates are those slabs of mantle and crust that, in their epochs-long drift, rearrange the earth’s continents and oceans. Most of the time, their movement is slow, harmless, and all but undetectable. Occasionally, at the borders where they meet, it is not.

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When the next very big earthquake hits, the northwest edge of the continent, from California to Canada and the continental shelf to the Cascades, will drop by as much as six feet and rebound thirty to a hundred feet to the west—losing, within minutes, all the elevation and compression it has gained over centuries. Some of that shift will take place beneath the ocean, displacing a colossal quantity of seawater….The water will surge upward into a huge hill, then promptly collapse. One side will rush west, toward Japan. The other side will rush east, in a seven-hundred-mile liquid wall that will reach the Northwest coast, on average, fifteen minutes after the earthquake begins. By the time the shaking has ceased and the tsunami has receded, the region will be unrecognizable.

Kenneth Murphy, who directs FEMA’s Region X, the division responsible for Oregon, Washington, Idaho, and Alaska, says in the piece, “Our operating assumption is that everything west of Interstate 5 will be toast.”

New Yorker illustration by Christoph Niemann


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